Archive for November, 2014

observations

Posted in Uncategorized on November 29, 2014 by darryl zero

I want to be clear about a few things.

1) The outrage about the Michael Brown shooting is not about simply the fact that a police officer shot an unarmed person. Darren Wilson shot an unarmed person under questionable circumstances six times. Even if an altercation occurred at Wilson’s car, Brown still managed to get 150 feet away from it before he was gunned down. That’s half a football field. Do you mean to tell me that Darren Wilson, an armed police officer who is 6’4″ and 210 pounds, felt that a man who clearly was trying to get away from him, still considered that man a threat? A 6’5″, 290lb. man in good shape is taking maybe six seconds to run half a football field. Wilson had ample time to decide what he was doing. No blood was found between Brown’s body and Wilson’s vehicle; granted, I wasn’t there, but if he’d been shot at close range enough to leave blood in Wilson’s vehicle, why wasn’t there any more blood between where he was allegedly shot first and where he died? It’s fishy, and–more importantly–it’s similar to other, equally fishy scenarios. Which brings me to my point–the outrage about the Michael Brown shooting is about the fact that it’s yet another example of the legal system assuming the killing of a Black person was completely justified.

2) Black people are disproportionately targeted and prosecuted by law enforcement for the same crimes that white people also commit, and for which they are not prosecuted–and, if your take on that is “Black people are more likely to commit crimes,” you’re part of the problem, because we aren’t. We’re just more likely to be prosecuted for one when we do, and our punishments are considerably more severe.

3) White people; if you do things like post instances in which white people were victims of injustice, then get all indignant about “where was [insert nonwhite civil rights leader] when that happened?,” you’re revealing your true colors. Sure, there are white people who are victims of legitimate injustices. But we’re not protesting the individual instances; we’re protesting a system that validates said injustice. Rodney King was messed up on drugs and was driving recklessly; did that mean he deserved to get the crap kicked out of him by white police officers? Michael Brown allegedly stole some cigarillos from a store and allegedly manhandled a store clerk who tried to stop him; does that mean he deserved to be shot six times? Eric Garner was allegedly selling cigarettes without a permit; did that mean he deserved to be choked to death? Ronald Singleton was high on PCP and freaking people out–did HE deserve to be choked to death? And that’s not even counting Jonathan Ferrell and Renisha McBride, whose killers fortunately will face prosecution, if not justice. Nonwhite people face clear systemic injustice in this country; pointing out the handful of times white people got a raw deal doesn’t dispute, disprove, or change this.